Skip to content Skip to footer
Search

Loading Results

PwC's COVID-19 CFO Pulse

PwC conducted a global tracking survey capturing the views of finance leaders about the COVID-19 outbreak. For our fifth look across the globe and the third for Turkey; we surveyed 989 CFOs from 23 countries or territories during the weeks of 1 June and 8 June. Turkey's major companies' CFOs shared their views on the crisis along with the other global finance leaders.

With the aim to offer a robust view of how the crisis is affecting people and businesses worldwide, our biweekly survey tracked the impacts of COVID-19 for nearly 3 months.

Global COVID-19 CFO Pulse reports:

   15 June 2020
   11 May 2020
   28 April 2020 
   14 April 2020 
   30 March 2020

Turkey COVID-19 CFO Pulse reports:

   15 May 2020
   4 May 2020

Finance leaders respond to the latest developments of COVID-19

When we surveyed CFOs around the world about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on their business two months ago, nearly half (45%) expected productivity loss because of a lack of remote work capabilities. At that time, many companies were in the early stages of crisis response, not yet thinking about strategies for recovery. Today, lockdowns are being lifted around the world as leaders of nations and companies accept that economies will reopen and function alongside a virus that remains a constant threat.

At the beginning of June, Ministry of Health of Turkey declared that Turkey entered the phase of normalization as of June, and highlighted that the main principle will be "controlled social life” in this period which involves health, society and economy aspects.

In the face of this sobering reality, CFOs have shifted their focus to bringing people back to a workplace that is fundamentally changed. Turkey CFOs consider changing workplace safety measures and requirements at top priority and they are very confident when it comes to safety. 

Many companies have weathered the immediate crisis — they’ve implemented safety measures, transitioned to remote work and other new ways of working, and are now thinking about what they need to survive and thrive moving forward. And, of course, they are doing so at a time of heightened social tension in which their leadership will be critically important. Even in a global sample with countries at different points of virus spread and government response, common themes emerge: concern about a new wave of infection and how to keep people safe, the need for agile plans to navigate a global economic downturn and reengage customers, and the pursuit of new revenue streams through innovation.

Top findings

  • As they implement return-to-work strategies, Turkey CFOs are most concerned about the effects of a global economic downturn (69%), the possibility of a new wave of infection (67%) and increased costs of doing business (31%).
  • More than half (56%) of Turkey CFOs expect a decrease in revenue and/or profits of up to 25% as a result of the crisis. To rebuild revenue streams, 67% are planning changes to their product or service offerings.
  • Workplace safety is still a top priority while companies are embracing new ways of working. Turkey CFOs consider accelerating automation and new ways of working (61%) and planning to improve the remote working experience (47%).

CFOs’ top concerns? The global economy and a potential new COVID-19 wave

It’s now been a few weeks since many countries have embarked on phased reopenings, slowly permitting more commerce and other activities. As these decisions unfold, CFOs are navigating return-to-work plans, determining when and how — and to what extent — to bring employees back. Among our respondents, the top concern as they implement these plans is the impact of a global economic downturn (60%), but an almost equally high number are worried about a new wave of infections (58%). Concerns about financial impact on their business, including effects on results of operations, future periods, liquidity and capital resources, are also running high (47%). Of less concern are issues such as supply chain disruptions (17%) and the ability to effectively manage hybrid remote and on-site work models (16%). This may be attributed to the fact that many companies have proven their capabilities in these areas during the previous weeks and months.

Turkey CFOs are most concerned about the effects of a global economic downturn (69%) and the possibility of a new wave of infection (67%). They are also concerned about increased costs of doing business (31%), and these results are cited slightly higher than their global peers.

The impact of a global downturn is a major source of worry across industries, led by industrial manufacturing and automotive CFOs (66%). Consumer markets CFOs, coping with shifting spending preferences and patterns, are more likely than average to be concerned about a decrease in consumer confidence (43%) and the increased cost of doing business (21%).

The impact of a global economic downturn is the number one concern among CFOs

What are your top-three concerns with respect to returning to the workplace and operating in a changed business environment?


Impacts of global economic downturn
%
New wave of COVID-19 infections
%
Financial impact, including effects on results of operations, future periods, and liquidity and capital resources
%
Decrease in consumer confidence reducing consumption
%
Increased costs of doing business
%
Supply chain disruptions
%
Ability to effectively manage hybrid remote and on-site work models
%
Effects on workforce/reduction in productivity
%
Lack of employee confidence in ability to keep them safe
%
Insufficient information to make good decisions
%
Cybersecurity risks
%

Source: PwC COVID-19 CFO Pulse Survey, 1 June 2020
Base: Turkey CFOs

Most CFOs anticipate a decrease in revenue this year

CFOs’ expectations of revenue decrease align with their concerns about the global downturn and financial impact, and with key economic indicators. The World Bank predicts that the global economy will experience the deepest recession since the end of World War II, with a 5.2% contraction in global GDP in 2020. Although the impact varies by region, none are untouched. The European Commission projected that the EU economy will decrease by 7.5% this year. Against this backdrop, 53% of CFOs expect a decrease in revenue and/or profits of up to 25%. Only 4% of CFOs say the impact of the crisis is still difficult to assess.

More than half (56%) of Turkey CFOs expect a decrease in revenue and/or profits of up to 25% as a result of the crisis. However, 28% of Turkey CFOs expect increase of revenue/profits or no impact to revenue/ profits - which is a more optimistic approach than overall.

From an industry perspective, health industries CFOs are more likely than average to expect a decrease in revenue of less than 10% or even an increase in revenue. Meanwhile, consumer markets CFOs — hard-hit by physical store closures and stay-at-home orders — are more likely to expect decreases of 25% to more than 50%.

More than half of CFOs expect a decrease in revenue of up to 25%

What impact do you expect on your company’s revenue and/or profits this year as a result of COVID-19?



Source: PwC COVID-19 CFO Pulse Survey, 1 June 2020
Base: Turkey CFOs

COVID-19 is accelerating new ways of working

While managing these financial challenges, the majority of CFOs in our survey have focussed on safety. They are planning new workplace safety measures (75%) and reconfiguring work sites to promote distancing (72%). But, of course, not everyone will be coming back to physical work sites. More than half of CFOs indicate they will take steps to improve the remote work experience (52%) and to make remote work a permanent option (52%), and 50% report they plan to accelerate automation and new ways of working. These findings correspond with the 75% of CFOs who say the increased flexibility developed during the crisis is a factor that will make their organisation stronger over the long term, and the 65% who cited the resiliency and agility they have built. To sustain these gains, company leaders will need to consider the tools, behaviours and incentives that will enable employees to be productive, collaborative and creative — and invest in areas that will have the most impact. Equally important, because remote work brings an elevated risk of burnout, leaders need to focus on employee well-being, including encouraging time away, offering mental health support and meeting people’s individual needs.

Turkey CFOs are planning new workplace safety measures (89%) and reconfiguring work sites to promote distancing (69%) for transition back to on-site work. Also, accelerating automation and new ways of working (61%) gain importance among Turkey CFOs’ priorities, cited more than overall. Changing shifts and/or alternating crews to reduce exposure (61%) support these cautions.

At the industry level, energy, utilities and resources CFOs are more likely than average to focus on workplace safety (83%), reconfiguring work sites (77%) and changing shifts to reduce exposure (59%). Health industries CFOs, perhaps reflecting the quick adoption of telemedicine, are more likely to plan to make remote work a permanent option for roles that allow it (64%) and to improve the experience (69%). They are also among the most likely to consider exploring location tracking (26%).

Workplace safety is a top priority, but many companies also plan to continue remote work

Which of the following is your company planning to implement once you start to transition back to on-site work?


Change workplace safety measures and requirements (e.g., wearing masks, offering testing to workers)
%
Reconfigure work sites to promote physical distancing
%
Accelerate automation and new ways of working
%
Change shifts and/or alternate crews to reduce exposure
%
Improve the remote working experience
%
Make remote work a permanent option for roles that allow
%
Evaluate new tools to support workforce location tracking and contact tracing
%
Reduce real estate footprint (e.g., partial opening of offices, retail locations)
%
Offer targeted benefits for on-site workers in affected areas (e.g., childcare, private transportation)
%
Provide hazard pay for on-site workers in affected areas
%

Source: PwC COVID-19 CFO Pulse Survey, 1 June 2020
Base: Turkey CFOs

Confidence among CFOs about safety preparations is high

Given their focus on the more tactical responses to bringing people back, it makes sense that CFOs report feeling very confident about their companies’ ability to provide a safe environment for customers (79%) and employees (74%). And, although a new wave of infection is among their top concerns, they also report feeling very confident that they would be able to respond effectively (71%). When it comes to more forward-looking measures, confidence starts to wane. Fewer CFOs say they are very confident about building skills for the future (45%) and identifying new revenue opportunities (27%). This makes sense: during the peak of the crisis, they were likely not as focused on these areas.

Turkey CFOs are very confident when it comes to safety; meeting customers’ safety expectations (92%). 81% is very confident in their second-wave response and shutdown protocols. From employee perspective; providing a safe working environment (69%) and managing well-being and morale (64%) are confidence areas.

Across industries, consumer markets CFOs (82%) report they are very confident in meeting customer safety expectations, a high priority in reopening retail stores. Consumer markets CFOs also report the highest level of confidence (34%) in the ability to identify new revenue opportunities, perhaps as a result of quickly pivoting to provide options for consumers while physical stores were closed. Financial services CFOs (76%) indicate the highest level of confidence about second-wave response and shutdown protocols.

CFOs are confident in their ability to keep customers and employees safe

A renewed focus on innovation will be critical to companies’ recovery

As they consider the future, companies are eager to rebuild or enhance revenue streams — which, as noted above, is an area where confidence is flagging. Most CFOs (63%) cite offering new or enhanced products or services as most important to this pursuit — underscoring the fact that innovation will be a driving factor during the recovery period. There will be a growing need for new ways of working to enhance the creativity required to sustain this innovation — for example, new tools, new behaviours and reinforcing incentives and rewards. Other top choices include changing pricing strategies by increasing or decreasing prices or offering different payment terms (48%) and exploring alternative distribution strategies, such as changing from in-person to virtual sales or delivery (36%).

Turkey CFOs cite products or services (67%) and pricing strategies (53%) as keys to rebuilding revenue. In addition, they cite supply chain strategies (42%) and geographic markets (39%) more than overall.

At the industry level, planned strategies vary widely. Technology, media and telecommunications CFOs (75%) are more likely than average to favour changes in products and services. Changes in pricing strategies are more likely to be cited by energy, utilities and resources CFOs (55%), who are also more likely to consider changes in geographic markets (37%). Health industries CFOs are more likely than average to consider changes to customer segments (48%).

Changing product and service offerings will be key to rebuilding revenue

Changes in which of the following will be most important to rebuilding or enhancing your revenue streams?


Products or services (e.g., offering new, enhanced, repurposed or pared-down solutions)
%
Pricing strategies (e.g., increasing/decreasing price of solutions, offering different payment terms)
%
Supply chain strategies (e.g., develop alternate sourcing options, change contractual terms)
%
Customer segments (e.g., selling direct-to-consumer, targeting new industries, moving from B2C to B2B)
%
Geographic markets (e.g., entering new markets, leaving current markets)
%
Distribution channels (e.g., changing from in-person to virtual sales or delivery)
%
Mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures or alliances
%
Talent (e.g., acquiring new talent, upskilling)
%

Source: PwC COVID-19 CFO Pulse Survey, 1 June 2020
Base: Turkey CFOs

Digital and R&D investments are holding strong

Cost containment remains the top financial action CFOs are considering as a result of the novel coronavirus (81%), but more than half (56%) of respondents are considering deferring or cancelling planned investments. Among the latter group, fewer CFOs today than in past CFO Pulse surveys say they will consider cancelling or deferring planned investments in R&D (14%). This is good news, given respondents’ belief in the importance of developing new products and services. CFOs are also not as likely to cut from their planned digital transformation investment (11%), which corresponds to findings about their plans to accelerate automation and improve the remote work experience. The most common area for potential cuts remains (as it has been in all of our CFO Pulse surveys) facilities/general CapEx (82%).

Even though Turkey CFOs consider cancelling or deferring general CapEx, almost all of them (94%) plan to continue digital transformation investments.

From an industry perspective, energy, utilities and resources CFOs are more likely than average to consider reductions in operation investments (64%) and less likely to cite IT investments (19%). Financial services CFOs are less likely than average to think about cuts to R&D (10%), and technology, media and telecommunications CFOs are least likely to plan to cut investments in environmental, social and governance activities (6%).

CFOs are more likely to cut general capex investments than digital, R&D or cybersecurity

You mentioned your company is considering deferring or cancelling planned investments as a result of COVID-19. Which of the following investment types are being considered in that regard?


Facilities/general capex
%
Operations
%
Environmental, social and governance activities
%
IT
%
Workforce
%
R&D
%
Digital transformation
%

Source: PwC COVID-19 CFO Pulse Survey, 1 June 2020
Base: Turkey CFOs

The pandemic has underscored the need for new skills, including empathetic leadership, resilience and agility, collaboration and digital skills, and technical and trade skills such as design, manufacturing, and cyber and supply chain management. Yet in PwC’s 23rd Annual Global CEO Survey (conducted before the coronavirus crisis, in September and October 2019), only 35% of CEOs from companies who self-identified as having more advanced upskilling organisations felt their programmes were very effective at reducing skills gaps and mismatches. Leaders may need to ramp up efforts in this area when possible, to ensure that their technology investments continue to benefit the company and that the resilience they created is built to last.

A look back at CFOs’ evolving response

Since we first surveyed CFOs about their perceptions of and responses to COVID-19 in March 2020, we’ve watched as they focussed on safety, managed health, economic and societal crises and adapted their business model to rapidly shifting circumstances. Ultimately, they accepted that they’ll need to find a way to exist alongside, and thrive in spite of, the ongoing possible threat of COVID-19 in the future. While bracing for a second wave of infection and working to enhance revenue streams, finance leaders will continue to prioritise agility as they navigate this new world.


About the survey

To help identify the business and economic impact of COVID-19, PwC has been conducting a global survey of finance leaders. Of the 989 surveyed for the global report during the weeks of 1 June and 8 June 2020, respondents were from 23 countries or territories.

 

Contact us

Talar Gül

Talar Gül

Financial Services Industry Leader, PwC Turkey

Tel: +90 212 326 6073

Dr. Gökhan Yılmaz

Dr. Gökhan Yılmaz

Forensics, Compliance and Crisis Consulting Leader, PwC Turkey

Tel: +90 212 326 6488

Follow us